Mrs. Renzulli's Class Blog

4th Grade Bloggers

My Arizona Tanka

May10

Grand Canyon HDR Panorama from S. Rim

Creative Commons License Akarsh Simha via Compfight

Tanka is a short Japanese verse that contains five lines. Line 1 contains 5 syllables; line 2 contains 7 syllables; line 3 contains 5 syllables; lines 4 and 5 both contain 7 syllables. These are some amazing Tanka poems written by 4th graders. Which one is your favorite? Do you think you can write your own?

My Arizona Tanka

By:Gwendalyn

Hot Arizona.

You see lots of scorpions.

There is beauty there.

The cacti there is awesome.

Arizona is the best.

 

Arizona Tanka

Grand Arizona   

A very colorful state

Snakes slither around

The beauty is a delight

The mountains are high and nice

By: Penelope

My Arizona Tanka

By:Gracie

Hot Arizona.

It is so colorful there.

The cacti is green.

My favorite color is gold.

Arizona is awesome.

My Arizona Tanka

Beautiful snakes rock       

They live in Arizona  

It is so hot here

It is very beautiful

Arizona has hot air.

By: Krisalyn

Sharing a Book

November3

Genetics Exhibit, San Jose Tech
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Thomas Hawk via Compfight

Share your favorite book!

 

 

What have you discovered in Science this week?

September23

 

Animal Cell

 

 

 

 

Plant Cell

Interested in our Weather?

August29

by Cali, Eva, and Hunter

After reading our Blogging Buddies recent post and comments, we found that they have been interested in our weather. We looked at our weather and we have found out that today, August 29, 2013, that it is 95°F. We realized that our Australian buddies won’t know how hot that is because their temperatures are read in Celsius.

We learned the formula for converting Fahrenheit to Celsius so we could share with our Blogging Buddies.

Our temperature today is 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Here are the steps to convert it to Celsius:

  1. First take 95 and subtract 32.
  2. Then divide by nine.
  3. Last, multiply that number by 5.

How do we convert Fahrenheit to Celsius? from Tracy Watanabe on Vimeo.

So, 95 degrees Fahrenheit is 35° Celsius. That’s how we converted our temperature so our Australian blogging buddies understand our temperature.

Would you care to answer a couple of questions for us:

Do you know how to convert temperatures from Celsius to Fahrenheit?

What’s your temperature today?

Did you notice it was going to storm here today? Did you find that unusual since we live in the Sonoran Desert?

 

posted under Blogging, Math | 3 Comments »

Blogging Buddies and Quality Comments

August21

post written by Mrs. Watanabe

Mrs. Renzulli’s class has the honor of having Blogging Buddies in Tasmania, Australia. Their class has started an introductory conversation with our class.

Before we comment back, we need to discuss quality comments.

Crafting quality comments

Watch this video by Mrs. Yollis’ students to learn about quality comments:

How to Compose a Quality Comment! from yourwonderfulteacher on Vimeo.

Created by Tracy Watanabe on Glogster Edu. Tips learned from Linda Yollis & Class.

The Common Core State Standards

The Common Core State Standards expects students to write quality comments:

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1a Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1b Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1c Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instancein order toin addition).
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1d Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

Rating Comments

I once heard Mrs. Yollis share that she rates quality comments. A “2 point” comment will add a compliment, add new information, make a personal connection, or ask a thought provoking question. While a “1 point” comment is a comment that does not give a specific compliment, add new information, make a personal connection, or as a thought provoking question. Let’s rate our comments throughout this year to make sure we write quality comments.

What areas do you believe you need to work on for writing quality comments?

What do you feel will be the easiest about writing quality comments?

What do you think will be the most challenging about writing quality comments?

posted under Blogging | No Comments »

Blogging Buddies and Quality Comments

August15

post written by Mrs. Watanabe

Mrs. Renzulli’s class has the honor of having Blogging Buddies in Tasmania, Australia. Their class has started an introductory conversation with our class.

Before we comment back, we need to discuss quality comments.

Crafting quality comments

Watch this video by Mrs. Yollis’ students to learn about quality comments:

How to Compose a Quality Comment! from yourwonderfulteacher on Vimeo.

Created by Tracy Watanabe on Glogster Edu. Tips learned from Linda Yollis & Class.

The Common Core State Standards

The Common Core State Standards expects students to write quality comments:

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1a Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1b Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1c Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instancein order toin addition).
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1d Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

Rating Comments

I once heard Mrs. Yollis share that she rates quality comments. A “2 point” comment will add a compliment, add new information, make a personal connection, or ask a thought provoking question. While a “1 point” comment is a comment that does not give a specific compliment, add new information, make a personal connection, or as a thought provoking question. Let’s rate our comments throughout this year to make sure we write quality comments.

What areas do you believe you need to work on for writing quality comments?

What do you feel will be the easiest about writing quality comments?

What do you think will be the most challenging about writing quality comments?

posted under Blogging | 1 Comment »

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