Lovin’ the Legos!

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Science, technology, food, oh my!  Who knew there were so many different things you could do with Legos.  Our class had a great day learning with Legos recently.  We created simple machines, made stop motion videos, built with them on the computer, designed a bridge to hold the most rocks, and even ate some Legos!  Yeah, you read right-we ate Legos!

Have you ever used Build with Chrome?  This is a great interactive site that lets you build with Lego bricks.  Try it out.

What’s your favorite thing to do with Legos?

 


Bubbling Over With Joy For School

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Students in our class were bubbling over with joy over the Back to School Bash our first week in school!  Why you ask?  Well, we had a Bubble Party!

 

Experimenting with bubbles is a blast!

Experimenting with bubbles is a blast!

We spent some time with family and friends participating in bubble activities.  We did bubble art, experimented with different types of bubble solution, blew bubbles and tried to catch them with a gloved hand, developed a hypothesis on which temperature of bubble solution would blow the best bubble, and tried blowing bubbles from bubble gum.

Take a look at some of the fun things we did…

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Have you ever tried to make your own bubble solution?  What did you use?  Did it work?

What do you like best about bubbles?


A Moldy Experience!

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Hi, this is Lilly and Claire!

Our class did a mold experiment to practice using the scientific method.  Our teacher said to pair up in groups of three for the project collaboration.  To go with the project, we made a science journal and we’re going to keep track of the results.

Here we are writing about our observations! We collaborated to get the best detail. We made our journals out of small gift bags.


First, we got a piece of bread.  We had to split the bread into three parts.  Then, we rubbed one of the pieces on a desk, one on a shoe, and the last on our tongue.  Each of us had to hypothesize which piece of bread we thought would have the most mold based off information we researched.

The petri dish with the three parts. Reminds me of a fraction!

 

After that, we put it in a petri dish.  The petri dish was split into three equal parts.  It was clear so we could see the mold as it grew.  We had to label it afterward so we knew which bread piece was which.   We put tape on the sides so it would be extra tight.  Once we had mold growing we didn’t want take the chance that it would open!  Yuck!


Look at what is happening to our bread!

Last we put it in a big black container under a desk.  We would check the mold twice a week.  It took a couple of weeks for the mold to become visible.   Once it did we were amazed at the different colors we saw!

Yummmm!

These are most of the colors we saw: yellow, black and blue-green.  We also saw white fluffy looking mold. Some people didn’t have any mold at all…my group!  Bummer!    We must be too clean.

There I am with my moldless bread! I am not looking too happy!

 

Here are some facts about mold…

There are five basic types of mold that grow on bread. The most common mold is penicillium.

Alexander Fleming discovered this mold.

Alexander Fleming

He found that this mold kills germs. He used this to make a medicine called penicillin which saved millions of lives over the last 80 years.
Mold is…
not a plant.
like mushrooms and toadstools. 
one of natures cleaners.
used as flavoring for foods such as blue cheese and soy sauce. 

What do you think would happen to our world if we didn’t have mold?