Learning from Each Other

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If you have been following our blog, you probably know that we have buddies in Kenya.

Our Kenya friends!

We are very lucky to have them as friends because we learn so much about their life and they learn so much from us.   Our class has become experts on the plant and animal life found in the desert, so we wanted to share some of what we know with them.

Exploring the desert outside our classroom!

We decided to create a poster on the information we learned and send it to our Kenya Buddies.

Here we are researching the species we took pictures of using our class digital camera. See the poster on the wall?

This way they will get to see what our desert looks like and the wildlife we have.  They just received it and are very happy.

Students at Bensesa School with the desert posters we made.

 

You may be asking what we have learned from them.  Well, let us tell you…

Kenya is a country in the eastern part of Africa.  The coast of Kenya is the Indian Ocean.

The capital of Kenya is Nairobi.  Our Kenya buddies go to a school that is in a rural part of Nairobi.

April is the one of the months that are rainy in Kenya.

They learn to speak English and Kiswahili in school.

A Day in the Life of a Kenyan Child

One of the foods they eat for breakfast is mandazi and chapati.

Mandazi is fried dough shaped like a doughnut.  The picture below was sent to us by our friends at Bensesa School.

They eat mandazi for breakfast.

They also eat chapati, which is fried dough.  They may have this for lunch or ugali.  

Chapati!

 

Serving ugali and mandazi at school.

Do you know an interesting fact about Kenya that you can share?

Do you know an interesting fact about the Sonoran Desert to share?

 

 

 


Christmas Generosity Update!

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Mrs. Fraher here.  We just received an update from the headmaster at Bensesa School in Nairobi, Kenya.  After wiring the money to them through Western Union, they received it just in time.  

Read his email below…

Hi Gina,
Well we received the money yesterday and everybody said God bless you all as we plan to give the report on how the amount is going to be utilized according to the budget we had for the kids and school.  After the Western Union converted US dollars $250, we received Kenya shillings 20,200.  Tell your students and your staff that God is going to reward them all abundantly, surely this money came at right time when life is very difficult in our country.Thanks,
Ben

 

 

 

 

 

 


Christmas Turtles for Our Kenya Buddies!

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We are doing this project for our Kenya Buddies at Bensesa School. They are really nice. They are from Kenya, Africa near the rainforest. They have some orphans in their school. We made some stuffed toy turtles for them because we wanted to let them know we are thinking of them for Christmas. We did this in December because that was when we sent them. We did it to make them feel good. We also raised money to send to them by selling pencils during our lunch break. Can you believe we raised $282 for them. Mrs. Fraher sent the money to them so they could get supplies for the school and take care of the children that go there.

This is how we made the stuffed toy turtles. First, we cut out cloth using a paper shaped like turtle. We pinned the paper shape to the fabric and cut it out. Next, we sewed it together with a sewing machine. We left a two inch space so we could put the stuffing in it. Then, we stuffed it with stuffing. We hand sewed the two inches together ourselves, but you can use a machine to do it if you want. Last, you cut out a two inch square cloth. We hand sewed it but again you can use a machine. I had fun doing this project and hope you do too if you want to make one! Here are some photos of us doing it.

by Nathan

Pictures!

Just the Facts!

Sea turtles are almost always submerged. Sea turtles possess a salt gland in the corner of their eye. They eat jelly fish and if you put trash in the ocean it is unhealthy for the turtles so don’t put trash in the waters. Do you have sea turtles where you live? If not, what kind of turtles do you have?