Bird, Bird…Bird is the Word!

Posted on

Our class is so excited to start our Project Feeder Watch program this year!  This is the third year in a row that Mrs. Fraher’s class has participated in this project through Cornell University.  Why not start it out with a bang?

Mrs. Goucher’s fourth grade class joined us one sunny Friday morning along with parents from both classes.  There was a great deal of excitement from both rooms.  Students had a great time participating in activities centered on birds.  Owl pellet dissection, making bird feeders, learning bird calls, going on a bird hunt, and creating bird art using different materials were just a few fun projects they were involved with.

Are you interested in seeing what we did?  Well, check this out:

 

Here some things our class likes about birds:

Trevor:  I like that there are so many different kinds of bird and that they are so colorful.

Avery:  I think it is cool that some birds can talk.

Tyler:  I like birds because they look so cute when they peek into our classroom window.

Brooke:  Birds puff up their feathers and it makes them look like a puffball.

Alexis:  That all species of birds make different sounds and you can tell the different birds by their sounds. 

Check out what these students think about birds.

Garrison:  It is interesting to look at all of the species of birds because they have different beaks, feet and feather colors.

Kyle:  I think it is cool that they can takes a bunch of sticks and with their beak they can make a nest.

Emma:  I like birds because you can have them as pets and feed them.

Trinity:  Some birds are nocturnal, like an owl and that you can’t hear their wings flap because of the special feathers they have.

Tyler:  I like birds because they help spread pollen to make flowers.

Skyler: I like birds because they are so different and some don’t even fly.  

Anne:  I like watching how their patterns change on their feathers and they get more beautiful as they grow.

What do you like about birds?



Project Feeder Watch Comes to a Close

Posted on

Our class has had a wonderful time this year on our Project Feeder Watch.  Check out what we did and learned during this great birding project!

First, we live in the Sonoran Desert so our goal was to examine and learn about the birds found in the Sonoran Desert.  Here is a Tagul from Justin about the bird species we saw.

Here are the bird species we saw from our class window and some facts about them by Nathan and Cassidy…

Here are some of the species we have seen using Blabberize:


Do you know the different features birders use to identify birds?  Take a look at this Show Me from Elly, Zach, and Cody to find out.

We hoped you enjoyed learning about birds with us.

Please comment and tell us something you learned.

There is another post with more information! Check it out!

 

 

 


Turkey Vulture Does the Math!

Posted on

Hi, my name is Christian.

I am going to tell you about the turkey vulture and how it did math.  I think the turkey vulture is funny looking, but an interesting bird.

Christian looking at his favorite book...Birds of Arizona!

A turkey vulture is one only birds that eats carrion as its main source of food.  This is good for the environment because dead animals can’t sit around or diseases will start.  I like to compare them to a live vacuum.  They suck up the waste!

How did the turkey vulture do math?  Look at the picture my dad took of this turkey vulture on our view fence in our backyard.

Taken from my backyard!

 

If you recall, there are 12 inches in one foot and one yard is equal to three feet.

How can we tell how long the wingspan is by just looking at the picture?

Well, let me tell you.

Look at the fence.  The space between each bar is six inches.  Now count how many spaces there are under the turkey vulture’s one wing.  I count six spaces.

Here’s the math:
six spaces times six inches for each bar equals thirty-six inches
OR
6 x 6 = 36
This tells us that one wing span is about 36 inches long.

What number do we know in measurement that is 36?

You are right!  There are 36 inches in a yard.  So, the turkey vulture’s one wingspan is 36 inches long, three feet or one yard.

How long would both his wings be?

Here are some fun facts about the turkey vulture:
The turkey vulture builds no nest, but lays eggs on a cliff or in a cave.  It’s eggs are white with brown markings.   The eggs remain eggs for 38-41 days.

Here I am with my friends discussing bird species.

What else can you tell me about the turkey vulture?


It’s Superman, It’s a Plane….No, It’s A Bird for Project Feeder Watch!

Posted on
We are doing a project called Project FeederWatch.  It is about finding different bird species, graphing and recording the number we see, and then reporting it to Cornell University.  
We are doing it for the Lab of Ornithology at Cornell University.  We are doing it October through March.  We are doing it in Mrs. Fraher’s class, Mrs. Goucher’s class, our school habitat, and by the desert wash outside our class.  
We are feeding the birds, observing the different feeder locations throughout the day, and recording what we find. 
The first steps of this project was to get to know the birds and their features and their habits so when we are ready to tally their numbers we know what species we are seeing.  
We did this through observing birds,
keeping a record of the species we have found using a digital camera and a birding  journal.  
   
                 So far, we have observed nineteen species!
 
       
     
       Cactus Wren                                      House Finch                                                White Crown Sparrow
Song Sparrow                                    Curved Bill Thrasher                              Gila Woodpecker
Gilded Flicker                                    Gamble’s Quail                                           Mourning Dove
Northern Cardinal                         American Robin                                        American Crow
Abert’s Towhee                                 Western Wood Pee-Wee
Take a look at some of the species we have seen:
Make your own slide show at Animoto.

Every week there are two new bird feeders that go out twice a day to fill the feeders by our window.  They put food on the window sill and the feeders.