Lovin’ the Legos!

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Science, technology, food, oh my!  Who knew there were so many different things you could do with Legos.  Our class had a great day learning with Legos recently.  We created simple machines, made stop motion videos, built with them on the computer, designed a bridge to hold the most rocks, and even ate some Legos!  Yeah, you read right-we ate Legos!

Have you ever used Build with Chrome?  This is a great interactive site that lets you build with Lego bricks.  Try it out.

What’s your favorite thing to do with Legos?

 


Family Follies-Happy About Habitats

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Each month our families get together to give us a chance to show off what we have been learning in class.  This month we all got together to learn about habitats around the world in a little different way.  First, we decorated our room with the weather of the habitat.

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Then we created dioramas showing what our habitat looked like.  We made our habitat interactive, though.  Instead of just writing information down and having parents read it, we typed up an informational paragraph about the animals and plants in our habitat.  Then we turned the paragraph into a QR code!  The parents who came used the QR Code Reader on their phones and our iPads to find out the facts.  It was kind of like a mystery.

The best part of the whole day was when we played Kahoot with our parents.  All of the questions were from the information we had on our dioramas.  Some of the students played with their parents and some played against their parents.  Conor won.  He had the most points of all.

It was a fun time learning and sharing with our families!  We can’t wait for our next Family Follies!


Harvest Time at Desert Vista!

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Our class is working hard on our garden, Nature’s Rainbow, the Hummingbird Garden, and our Sunflower Garden. We harvested kohlrabi, cilantro, tomatoes, and green onions.  Each of us got to try the tomatoes.  They were a lot better than the ones at the store.  We also tried the kohlrabi.  It tasted kind of like broccoli.  Our Tower Garden arrived and we were able to put even more vegetables and herbs in it.

Take a look…

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We are working with the Master Gardening Club in Gold Canyon.  Each Monday Myrna comes and helps us garden and teaches us more about gardening.  Did you know that tomatoes should be replanted up to the stem?  

What bits of information can you give us to help us make our garden a success?


See Our Garden Grow!

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Our class has been hard at work revitalizing our school garden.  This is a great way for us to learn about plants and their habitats.

Class families got together on a fabulous Saturday morning to make a couple raised garden beds and to make our garden pretty.  Take a look.

Getting the spot ready to build the first raised garden bed.

Getting the spot ready to build the first raised garden bed.

Super dads work on building the garden bed while we get the soil ready.

Super dads work on building the garden bed while we get the soil ready.

Taking care of our herbs and flowers.

Taking care of our herbs and flowers.

This is some great soil!

This is some great soil!

Hard workers posing with Wyatt, the Scarecrow.

Hard workers posing with Wyatt, the Scarecrow.

Up close of Wyatt the Scarecrow.  He is named after the little boy who donated the clothes.

Up close of Wyatt the Scarecrow. He is named after the little boy who donated the clothes.

Let's take a break and watch the dads build.

Let’s take a break and watch the dads build.

Wow, it looks so neat and clean.

Wow, it looks so neat and clean.

A view of some rosemary and aloe vera.

A view of some rosemary and aloe vera.

Inspecting one of our raised gardens.  They are ready for some yummy vegetables.

Inspecting one of our raised gardens. They are ready for some yummy vegetables.

Do you have any advice for us on gardening?


Science Sleepover

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We ended the year with a Science Sleepover…not so much sleep, though.  We had a lot of fun spending time with family and friends as we learned about vibration, pitch, and sound.  

Check out what we did!

What a great way to end the year!  We learned so much about vibration, pitch, and sound using the experiments from The Museum of Science, Art, and Human Perception.   We made three different instruments that used vibrations to make sound.

Do you play a musical instrument?


Bristle Bots: An Electric Beginning

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So, we all know electricity is everywhere and we would have a hard time living without it, But do you know what electricity is and how it works?  No?  Well, sit back and enjoy!

Electricity is the flow of electrons that have moved out of its path.  The electrons normally just kind of hangout around tightly packed protons and neutrons.  The magic of electricity doesn’t happen until you give it a pathway to flow called a current.

Learn more by visiting Kid’s Corner: Electricity

Unfortunately, our body can be a pathway for electricity to travels.

Unfortunately, our body can be a pathway for electricity to travels.

Our class has been learning about electricity so we can understand how bristle bots work.  Basically, a bristle bot uses a closed electrical circuit to power the motor that causes the bristle bot to work. 

Using a pager motor, two wires (the current), and a double A battery (the electrical source) we made an electrical circuit.  We hot glued this to two toothbrushes.  Then we had to put our personal stamp on it and added pipe cleaners and google eyes.  Wah-la!  The birth of a bristle bot.  Take a look:

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Ready to see what one looks like?

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Ahhh, cute, right?  So, what do we plan on doing with them?  Well, we are going to race them!  Stay tuned for the races…you won’t want to miss them.

What do you think would happen if we didn’t have electricity?  

What would be some ways we would have to adapt?

 


Oreo Project 2014

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There is so more to an Oreo than two cookie wafers and some creamy filling!  Our class learned this first hand as we participated in this year’s Oreo Project through Projects by Jen.     We started with creating a hypothesis, then went on to brainstorming variables affecting stack stability, and then joined our buddy class in Ohio to a stacking challenge.  To get the variables, we had to analyze the Oreo very carefully.  We created a line plot on stack counts and used that data to determine stack average.  Our class also created an Oreo Book containing facts we learned about the Oreo and the line plot containing stack data. 

Take a look!

Can you guess the four main variables affecting the stability of an Oreo stack?

Another activity we did with the Oreo was to create our own “I Wonder If I Gave an Oreo” story based on the Oreo commercial with the same title.  Here is the commercial.  Stay tuned for our version of the same.


Worm is the Word

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Worm, worm…worm is the word!  

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Worms are so cool and very important to our world, but these silent creatures don’t get the props they deserve!  Without earthworms, the soil our plants grow in would not be as rich in nutrients.  Our class decided to practice the Scientific method while learning about the worm.

First, what is the scientific method?  steps to follow when you want to ask and answer questions in a science experiment.

Using the scientific method to learn about worms.

Using the scientific method to learn about worms.

Recording our observations

Recording our observations

Next, what we learn about the earthworm?  Earthworms can get up to 14 inches long.  they can’t live where it gets permafrost.  they have segments called annuli.  an earthworms makes our soil better.  they can eat up to a third of its way each day.  Some people didn’t want to touch the worm!  they’re so cute!

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Last, what did we  do with the earthworms when we were done observing them?  Our class has a hummingbird garden.  we released the worms to help the plants grow better.  the plants are important because the hummingbirds drink the nectar from the blooms.

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What do you know about earthworms?


Bubbling Over With Joy For School

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Students in our class were bubbling over with joy over the Back to School Bash our first week in school!  Why you ask?  Well, we had a Bubble Party!

 

Experimenting with bubbles is a blast!

Experimenting with bubbles is a blast!

We spent some time with family and friends participating in bubble activities.  We did bubble art, experimented with different types of bubble solution, blew bubbles and tried to catch them with a gloved hand, developed a hypothesis on which temperature of bubble solution would blow the best bubble, and tried blowing bubbles from bubble gum.

Take a look at some of the fun things we did…

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Have you ever tried to make your own bubble solution?  What did you use?  Did it work?

What do you like best about bubbles?


My Spidey Senses are Tingling!

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So, everyone likes spiders, right?  What’s not to love?  The long, hairy legs, the multiple, beady eyes, or the fangs ready to pierce the skin?  Yeah, OK.  They are kind of gross.  We took a poll in our class and found out that about half of us hate spiders and the others like them, but we all find them very interesting.  Mrs. Fraher hates them ever since she got bit by a recluse spider.  It was very painful for her.

Our classroom is near a door leading to a playground near a desert wash.  This means that we get all kinds of creepy crawlies coming through the cracks in the door.  Here are some pictures we took of some of them:

Let’s find out more about spiders.  Here is what we learned after our research:

Spiders are not insects.  They have eight legs and insects have six legs.

Not all spiders spin webs.  This is because they can’t make silk.

Most spiders have eight eyes.  Ughhh!  Some spiders that live in caves and soil have no eyes at all!

There are about 35,000 different species of spiders in the world.  There are 3,000 spiders in North America.

Spiders have claws at the end of their legs.

Arizona has two very poisonous spiders:  the Black Widow and the Brown Recluse.  There are three main kids of black widow spiders and about 13 species of recluses.  Not all of them live just in Arizona.

Do you want to find out more about spiders?  Here are a couple great sites where we found our information.  Explorit Science Center and Arizona-Desert Museum: Spiders

Let’s have a little fun with a spider.  Here is a video Mrs. Fraher found on Facebook on a spider.  We thought it was super funny.

What facts can you tell us about spiders?  

Have you ever been bit by a spider?  

What spider species do you like the best?