6th Grade Common Core Math

Tips and Support for Common Core Math Implementation

Tips, Mathematical Practices, and Ideas about Solving Equations

on September 19, 2013

Topic 4- Solving Equations

September 23-30 (Oct. 1 Post test 4/Pretest 5)

Lesson

4-1 Properties of Equality

CCSS

6.EE.4

 AZ AIMS Standards

4-2 Solving Addition and Subtraction Equations 6.EE.7
4-3 Problem Solving: Draw a Picture and Write an Equation 6.EE.7 M06-S3C2-01, M06-S5C2-03
4-4 Solving Multiplication and Division Equations 6.EE.7 M06-S1C1-06, M06-S1C2-02, M06-S1C2-03
K95 Powers and Roots M06-S1C1-06
4-5 Problem Solving: Draw a Picture and Write an Equation 6.EE.7 M06-S3C2-01, M06-S5C2-03, M06-S5C2-05

Technology Integration Weekly Highlight

Have you allowed students to “show their thinking” with problem solving on an iPad app such as Educreations? This app records their voice and everything written on the screen. They can even take a photo of their paper (or book) and talk through how they solved the problem. If the teacher creates a free account, then is syncs with the  teacher account to be viewed on any device. Click here for a tutorial.

Tip of the Week

This tip comes from the ADE for 6.EE.7:

Students create and solve equations that are based on real world situations. It may be beneficial for students to draw pictures that illustrate the equation in problem situations. Solving equations using reasoning and prior knowledge should be required of students to allow them to develop effective strategies.

Example:

  • Meagan spent $56.58 on three pairs of jeans. If each pair of jeans costs the same amount, write an algebraic equation that represents this situation and solve to determine how much one pair of jeans cost.

Screen Shot 2013-09-06 at 10.11.45 AM

Sample Solution: Students might say: “I created the bar model to show the cost of the three pairs of jeans. Each bar labeled J is the same size because each pair of jeans costs the same amount of money. The bar model represents the equation 3J = $56.58. To solve the problem, I need to divide the total cost of 56.58 between the three pairs of jeans. I know that it will be more than $10 each because 10 x 3 is only 30 but less than $20 each because 20 x 3 is 60. If I start with $15 each, I am up to $45. I have $11.58 left. I then give each pair of jeans $3. That’s $9 more dollars. I only have $2.58 left. I continue until all the money is divided. I ended up giving each pair of jeans another $0.86. Each pair of jeans costs $18.86 (15+3+0.86). I double check that the jeans cost $18.86 each because $18.86 x 3 is $56.58.”

  • Julio gets paid $20 for babysitting. He spends $1.99 on a package of trading cards and $6.50 on lunch. Write and solve an equation to show how much money Julio has left.

(Solution: 20 = 1.99 + 6.50 + x, x = $11.51)

Screen Shot 2013-09-06 at 10.11.56 AM

Double Dose Recommendations

Continue 5th grade cyclical review based on IE;   Kim Sutton Math Routines (Number Line Workbook, Place Value, Math Drills to Thrill).

Math Practices

This tip comes from the ADE about making sense of problems and persevering in solving them (6.MP.1):

In grade 6, students solve problems involving ratios and rates and discuss how they solved them. Students solve real world problems through the application of algebraic and geometric concepts. Students seek the meaning of a problem and look for efficient ways to represent and solve it. They may check their thinking by asking themselves, “What is the most efficient way to solve the problem?”, “Does this make sense?”, and “Can I solve the problem in a different way?”.

 How do you make students’ thinking visible in the classroom especially with solving equations?

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